What Teachers Must Consider When Moving to Flexible Seating

"Each student gets a chance to set up the room on a rotating schedule." 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: ww2.kqed.org

Campfires, watering holes, and caves -- when it comes to flexible learning environments, there are many considerations and stakeholder perspectives. Include the students themselves - give them a 'voice' in rearranging the space.  And what about organizational considerations like rules/policies regarding desks and seating capacity? What about the custodial staff and their concerns about cleaning, maintenance, and safety? 

 

What are your considerations, successes, struggles? 

Beware of the Word ‘Flexible’: Architect Danish Kurani on Designing 21st Century Schools (EdSurge News)

“Flexible.” It’s a word that often pops up in conversations about redesigning learning environments, relating to choices in furniture or movable walls. But according to Danish Kurani, redesigning 21st century classrooms goes much deeper than merely achieving flexibility—it involves going all the way back to considering Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.


Danish Kurani
Kurani is a licensed architect who focuses his work on learning spaces, and currently teaches a “Learning Environments for Tomorrow” course at the Harvard Graduate School of Education every year. Having worked on locations ranging from Denver’s Columbine Elementary to SELNY, a psychotherapy clinic and adult learning center in New York, Kurani has seen and used a variety of tactics to implement learning design in pursuit of specific goals.

This week, EdSurge sat down with him to hear about the most common design constraints, architecture gone wrong, and the work his firm recently conducted on the Code Next Lab in Oakland. Check out the Q&A below, or the recording on the EdSurge podcast.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.edsurge.com

Indeed, the FLEX in FLEXspace isn't just about flexible spaces, we must also consider learning outcomes and activities, needs of individual instructors and students using the spaces, and more.

 

“Flexible.” It’s a word that often pops up in conversations about redesigning learning environments, relating to choices in furniture or movable walls. But according to Danish Kurani, redesigning 21st century classrooms goes much deeper than merely achieving flexibility—it involves going all the way back to considering Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

 

Kurani is a licensed architect who focuses his work on learning spaces, and currently teaches a “Learning Environments for Tomorrow” course at the Harvard Graduate School of Education every year. Having worked on locations ranging from Denver’s Columbine Elementary to SELNY, a psychotherapy clinic and adult learning center in New York, Kurani has seen and used a variety of tactics to implement learning design in pursuit of specific goals.

 

This week, EdSurge sat down with him to hear about the most common design constraints, architecture gone wrong, and the work his firm recently conducted on the Code Next Lab in Oakland. Check out the Q&A below, or the recording on the EdSurge podcast.

We’re designing schools of the future with tools of the past—and it’s hurting our education

Sourced through Scoop.it from: qz.com

"We invest literally billions of dollars and years of effort into improvements in education around the world, but we fall short at the final step. We’re making leapfrog-like advancements in nearly every aspect of education, yet when it comes to thinking about and investing in the learning spaces themselves, we are woefully behind. We are building a state-of-the-art Formula 1 engine in the body of an old, broken-down Buick, and wondering why the car won’t go as fast as we thought it would."

Teachers Learn About Active Learning At BOCES Workshop

HARRISON, N.Y. -- Educators from all over the Hudson Valley got a feel for how active learning should take place at the Lower Hudson Regional Information Center’s Active Learning Center in Harrison on Aug. 22 and 23. The interactiv

Sourced through Scoop.it from: harrison.dailyvoice.com

I encourage these schools to add their active learning classrooms to our collection!