Library 2.017: MAKERSPACES Webinar

We’re excited to announce our third Library 2.017 mini-conferences: Makerspaces, which will be held online (and for free) on Wednesday, October 11th, from 12…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.library20.com

Looking forward to the opportunity to collaborate with the Library 2.0 community. This is a perfect fit where campuses can contribute their library spaces to the FLEXspace collection so others can browse and seek inspiration and lessons learned. 

USC Upstate tour – Indiana University

For those who missed the live tour for the University of South Carolina – Spartanburg, here is the recording. Thanks Julie Johnston for sharing! Check out further details about this space in FLEXspace.  

https://iu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/media/t/1_57k8ei9b  Thank you to our colleagues for participating!

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: iu.mediaspace.kaltura.com

For those who missed the live tour for the University of South Carolina – Spartanburg, here is the recording. Thanks Julie Johnston for sharing! Check out further details about this space in FLEXspace.   https://iu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/media/t/1_57k8ei9b  Thank you to our colleagues for participating!

Make it at ‘mkrspace’: ASU hub of creative creation

The “maker movement” is alive at ASU. Hayden Library is hosting “Maker Monday” from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in its second-floor “mkrspace.” The event uses creativity and innovation to celebrate the library’s 50th anniversary.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: asunow.asu.edu

The Maker Movement – is your campus a part of it? What kinds of learning spaces are you building or redesigning to support it?

Makerspaces and their growing role in STEM education

As a young child, years before the first Harry Potter book was published, I sat at my mother’s kitchen table mixing together anything I could find into a tall glass and calling it a potion. Now, th…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blogs.iu.edu

See what they’re up to at Indiana University. Wonderful post about the importance of makerspaces and their growing role in STEM education.

On placemaking

In this post I point to some of the literature on placemaking to inform the idea of digital placemaking which I introduced in the previous post and will develop in subsequent posts. O’Rourke and Bladwin (2016, p.103) note the “interconnected themes of place identity, attachment, and sense of community.” This gives us a sense of…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: tactilelearning.wordpress.com

This is very interesting and I will read further about #placemaking. We are currently redesigning the FLEXspace interface and user experience, and thinking about the “Spaces” themselves (those contributed as examples in the collection), as well as the FLEXspace “space” itself – the website and tool where you find inspiration, examples, information, and community, through targeted actions as well as through the serendipitous encounters with information and others. 

Beware of the Word ‘Flexible’: Architect Danish Kurani on Designing 21st Century Schools (EdSurge News)

“Flexible.” It’s a word that often pops up in conversations about redesigning learning environments, relating to choices in furniture or movable walls. But according to Danish Kurani, redesigning 21st century classrooms goes much deeper than merely achieving flexibility—it involves going all the way back to considering Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

Danish Kurani
Kurani is a licensed architect who focuses his work on learning spaces, and currently teaches a “Learning Environments for Tomorrow” course at the Harvard Graduate School of Education every year. Having worked on locations ranging from Denver’s Columbine Elementary to SELNY, a psychotherapy clinic and adult learning center in New York, Kurani has seen and used a variety of tactics to implement learning design in pursuit of specific goals.

This week, EdSurge sat down with him to hear about the most common design constraints, architecture gone wrong, and the work his firm recently conducted on the Code Next Lab in Oakland. Check out the Q&A below, or the recording on the EdSurge podcast.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.edsurge.com

Indeed, the FLEX in FLEXspace isn’t just about flexible spaces, we must also consider learning outcomes and activities, needs of individual instructors and students using the spaces, and more.

 

“Flexible.” It’s a word that often pops up in conversations about redesigning learning environments, relating to choices in furniture or movable walls. But according to Danish Kurani, redesigning 21st century classrooms goes much deeper than merely achieving flexibility—it involves going all the way back to considering Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

 

Kurani is a licensed architect who focuses his work on learning spaces, and currently teaches a “Learning Environments for Tomorrow” course at the Harvard Graduate School of Education every year. Having worked on locations ranging from Denver’s Columbine Elementary to SELNY, a psychotherapy clinic and adult learning center in New York, Kurani has seen and used a variety of tactics to implement learning design in pursuit of specific goals.

 

This week, EdSurge sat down with him to hear about the most common design constraints, architecture gone wrong, and the work his firm recently conducted on the Code Next Lab in Oakland. Check out the Q&A below, or the recording on the EdSurge podcast.

We’re designing schools of the future with tools of the past—and it’s hurting our education

Sourced through Scoop.it from: qz.com

“We invest literally billions of dollars and years of effort into improvements in education around the world, but we fall short at the final step. We’re making leapfrog-like advancements in nearly every aspect of education, yet when it comes to thinking about and investing in the learning spaces themselves, we are woefully behind. We are building a state-of-the-art Formula 1 engine in the body of an old, broken-down Buick, and wondering why the car won’t go as fast as we thought it would.”

How Creative Collisions Drive Innovation

“That’s the architectural invention of creative collisions, that you create architecture that allows these accidental ad hoc kind of meetings of minds and people to happen,” he said.

Take the learning spaces, for example. Under older teaching methods, one person stood in the front of a room and other people listened. It is a highly structured and hierarchical relationship, says Kleinman. In the new campus that will be blown apart. The spaces draw inspiration from artists’ studios, where groups work collaboratively and can critique one another’s work.

When the new campus was being designed, the team explored how these kinds of spaces functioned and looked at how such concepts could be applied to Cornell Tech’s needs. They asked questions such as: how do studios work? What kind of spaces qualify as jury space? What kind of surfaces? What kind of furniture?

The result is learning spaces which are open, flexible, and full of daylight. There are surfaces which are designed to be appealing to the touch.

From writing on the walls to moving furniture, learning spaces aren’t just vacant spaces for students to work on computers.

These design choices also reflect the innovative teaching styles at Cornell Tech. It also mirrors the interdisciplinary language used by staff, which might draw on a range of fields, including art education.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: tech.cornell.edu

“That’s the architectural invention of creative collisions, that you create architecture that allows these accidental ad hoc kind of meetings of minds and people to happen…

In the new campus…”spaces draw inspiration from artists’ studios, where groups work collaboratively and can critique one another’s work. When the new campus was being designed, the team explored how these kinds of spaces functioned and looked at how such concepts could be applied to Cornell Tech’s needs. They asked questions such as: how do studios work? What kind of spaces qualify as jury space? What kind of surfaces? What kind of furniture?

 

The result is learning spaces which are open, flexible, and full of daylight. There are surfaces which are designed to be appealing to the touch.”

 

Read more …..

20 Years In the Making, A New Building Brings Innovation to Students

As we evolve and become more efficient, so do the spaces around us. Colleges and universities take advantage of the advancements in modern architecture and technology to provide students with improved learning environments.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blog.suny.edu

Another exciting new learning space from SUNY!

“One of the newest buildings paving the way to the future is the all new Science Hall at New Paltz, which held its grand opening at a March 9 ribbon cutting.

Being the first new building in 20 years, the 77,000 square foot Science Hall is helping fill the need to provide students and faculty with innovative learning spaces. The building houses programs in Computer Science, Geology, Physics and Astronomy, Geography, and the AC2 program. The AC2 program is in place to support students in STEM disciplines from underrepresented backgrounds.…….”